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Our Favourite Things to Do in Anglesey

From heading out onto the water to exploring the countryside, Anglesey is full of exciting things to do

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A brown tombstone and a white lighthouse along a coastal path in Llanddwyn Island overlooking the sea, Anglesey, Wales, UK

Despite its small size, Anglesey is jam-packed with fun activities. There’s something for everyone on this island, whether you want to stay fit in nature, see some action on the water, or step back into time. Not sure what to put on the itinerary? Lucky for you, here at Plum Guide we’re experts, and not just self-proclaimed ones. We really do know everything when it comes to travel, so sit back and put your feet up for now. Take a look at our guide to the very best things to do in Anglesey.

Try your hand at some watersports

A green kayak in water alongside orange paddles on a wooden dock in Anglesey, Wales

A green kayak in water alongside orange paddles on a wooden dock in Anglesey, Wales

Surrounded by 125 miles of coastline, it would be a crime to visit Anglesey and not try at least one watersport, right? There’s plenty to choose from, but some of the most popular activities are surfing, windsurfing, kitesurfing, diving, kayaking, sailing and coasteering. Just a few, then. With sandy beaches, hidden coves and favourable sea winds, the main areas for watersports on the island are Rhosneigr, Trearddur Bay, Beaumaris and Holyhead. Don’t know your harness from your helmet? Peidiwch â phoeni (that’s Welsh for ‘don’t worry’), as Anglesey has a good selection of watersport centres where you can rent equipment and take lessons from qualified instructors. Who knows, maybe you'll even find your true calling.

Blackberries & Bloom, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Blackberries & Bloom, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Visit Plas Newydd House & Gardens

Here at Plum Guide, it’s no secret that we love houses of all shapes and sizes. That’s why we think that visiting a historic house is one of the best things to do in Anglesey. The most impressive of them all is Plas Newydd House & Gardens. Right on the shore of the Menai Strait, this 18th-century home once belonged to the Marquess of Anglesey. Feast your eyes on extravagant Neoclassical rooms fitted with unique furnishings and lavish fabrics. The house is home to one of the largest and most famous murals in the UK, painted by artist Rex Whistler who was a regular visitor in the early 20th century. If you can tear yourself away from all the luxuries, step out into the garden which boasts a riot of colours and views across the Menai Strait.

Hunting The Wren, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Hunting The Wren, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Take a trip to Beaumaris Castle

Beaumaris Castle with a moat of water next to green trees in Anglesey, Wales

Beaumaris Castle with a moat of water next to green trees in Anglesey, Wales

Wales is often dubbed ‘the land of castles’ as there are a whopping 427 of them. Anglesey alone has six to choose from, but Beaumaris Castle is arguably the most impressive. It was the last of the royal strongholds built by Edward I in Wales in the 13th century. It’s known as the greatest castle built but never completed, as lack of money and unrest in Scotland ceased operations. At the time, the castle was known for its state of the art design, built with near-perfect symmetry - a rather expensive white elephant. Today, it’s a wonderland for history geeks as it boasts a water-filled moat with its own dock, eerie corridors and narrow spiral staircases. A visit here will have you feeling like royalty, so it isn't one too miss off the itinerary.

Stone Lemons, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Stone Lemons, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Walk the Anglesey Coastal Path

Outdoor lovers and walking enthusiasts won’t want to miss this one. The Anglesey Coastal Path is a long distance route that threads right round the island, stretching for 225 kilometres, and is located within an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Besides walking through the ever-changing dramatic coastline, you’ll also experience coastal heath, farmland, sand dunes and woodland. It takes an average of 12 days to complete, but if you don’t feel up to the challenge (we won't blame you), there are shorter sections of the path that you can take. We like the sound of the ones that conveniently have a pub at the end.

The Marquess, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

The Marquess, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

Hop on a bike and pedal away

A bicycle standing on a dirt path next to green grass on a foggy day in Anglesey, Wales

A bicycle standing on a dirt path next to green grass on a foggy day in Anglesey, Wales

If you’re happier on a bicycle than your own two legs, then you'll be pleased to know that Anglesey is the ideal place for cycling. As well as certain sections of the Anglesey Coastal Path, there are several routes that go through and around the island. Lôn Las Cefni is a route that takes you through some picturesque Anglesey scenes, including Malltraeth Marsh, various local nature reserves, an old market town, and a reservoir. Meanwhile, Route 566 is another good one which offers you a little taste of Anglesey’s history. It takes you through salt marshes, a local nature reserve, and a reservoir before joining Lôn Las Copr (or the Copper Trail). Keep your eyes peeled for Swtan, Anglesey’s last remaining thatched cottage and Llynnon Mill, the only working windmill in Wales.

Admire the views from South Stack Lighthouse

One of the more unique things to do in Anglesey is taking a trip to South Stack Lighthouse. Situated on its own little island on Anglesey’s west coast, this dramatic, scenic spot is a reserve for different habitats including heathland, farmland, cliffs, coast and ocean. If you have a fear of heights then you might want to miss this one out, as the only way to get to the lighthouse is via 400 (yes, four hundred) steps in the cliffside and across a bridge over the crashing waves below. It’s worth the adventure as you can have a nosy around the engine room and climb up to the top for some magnificent views out to sea. Birdwatchers will really find themselves smiling here, as the site is home to 9,000 seabirds including puffins, razorbills and kittiwake.

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