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Where to Stay in Anglesey

Heading to this charming Welsh island? Then you need to know exactly where to stay

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A bridge and a body of water next to some rocks in Menai Bridge, Anglesey, Wales, UK

Who says you need to travel to some far-flung island for a proper getaway? Anglesey has everything you could possibly wish for when it comes to an island break - yes, even the weather can be good (sometimes). Think sandy beaches, blue waters and a good deal of tasty food and drink. Sound good? We thought so. There are a fair few seaside towns and villages around the island, to the point where it may seem overwhelming when picking somewhere to stay, but that’s where we come in. Here at Plum Guide, we know exactly where to stay, what to do and what to see - we are the experts after all. That’s why we’ve put together this guide to where to stay in Anglesey, so read on.

Beaumaris

Beaumaris Castle behind its moat, Anglesey, Wales, UK

Beaumaris Castle behind its moat, Anglesey, Wales, UK

Beaumaris (pronounced bow-maris) is a charming seaside town on the east coast of Anglesey. One of its main draws is Beaumaris Castle, a UNESCO World Heritage site. The castle dates back to 1295 and is in fantastic condition, offering a fun day out for all ages. Unfortunately, it’s not a Plum Guide listing just yet, but we’re working on it. Take a stroll along the seafront to the Victorian pier, and remember to take your camera, as the views over the Menai Strait and Snowdonia National Park are unbeatable. The pier also offers pleasure cruises and fishing trips if you fancy seeing the town from a different angle. Make your way back through the town’s small streets, lined with delightful pastel coloured cottages, and discover the true charm of the area. Pop into the independent arts and craft shops before settling down with a brew at one of the many lively cafes and pubs.

Honey Isle, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

Honey Isle, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

Rhosneigr

The seaside village of Rhosneigr (we’re not going to attempt the pronunciation on this one) is a jewel in Anglesey’s crown. Located on the western shores of Anglesey, the village boasts a handful of long, sandy beaches: Traeth Llydan, Rhosneigr beach, Traeth Crigyll and Cymyran beach. It’s a popular place for all kinds of watersports, but if you’re a newbie, don’t worry - the Funsport shop at the end of Beach Road offers lessons from qualified instructors, as well as a wide range of equipment to rent. Haven’t found your sea legs just yet? Rhosneigr is also home to the 18-hole Anglesey Golf Club which boasts fantastic views of Snowdonia and the Llyn Peninsula. For wildlife lovers, the nearby Llyn Maelog has an all-access boardwalk for nature watching - keep your eyes and ears out for the melodious reed warbler. Somewhere in the reeds, we presume.

Shadow & Light, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

Shadow & Light, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

Trearddur Bay

People standing in the sea at the beach at Trearddur Bay, Anglesey, Wales, UK

People standing in the sea at the beach at Trearddur Bay, Anglesey, Wales, UK

No, that's not a typo. You’ll find the popular seaside resort Trearddur Bay on the north-west coast of Anglesey. The main beach has a Blue Flag Award too, so you just know it's well worth a visit. It's large, sandy and gets the sun all day long, which is a win in anyone’s book. Naturally, it’s also one of Anglesey’s top locations for watersports, where you can try diving, sailing, kayaking, surfing and coasteering. Porth Diana is a sandy, sheltered cove tucked away on the southern shores of Trearddur Bay, and is a great spot for rock pooling. The bay is a quick drive to Holyhead, the main ferry port to Ireland, so you can even enjoy day trips to Dublin, if you fancy.

Stone Foot, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

Stone Foot, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

Benllech

With its award-winning golden sands and blue waters, Benllech should be on every single list of where to stay in Anglesey. This village on Anglesey’s east coast has the perfect beach for all kinds of coastal activities including swimming, surfing, windsurfing, paddle-boarding, kayaking, rock pooling and fishing. The village itself has a good amount of cafes and restaurants to suit all tastes, whether that’s fresh seafood or afternoon tea overlooking the sea. If you’re a self-proclaimed bird geek (there’s definitely a theme emerging here), then you’ll want to take the short drive to Red Wharf Bay. This designated nature reserve is full of bird life, particularly waders and waterfowl.

The Marquess, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

The Marquess, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

Llangefni

Wondering where to stay in Anglesey that isn’t by the coast? Llangefni is Anglesey’s county town, located almost directly in the middle of the island in a lovely blend of nature and that classic ‘Welsh town’ feel - the type of place where you could turn any corner and stumble across a farmers market in full flow. Indeed, if you’re visiting on a Thursday or Saturday, Llangefni’s bustling open-air market is the best spot to pick up some local produce. Take a stroll to the Dingle, a wooded valley and local nature reserve complete with sculptures, charming bridges, and plenty of wildlife. Back in town, Oriel Ynys Môn is a must-visit museum and arts gallery where you can learn about Anglesey’s unique heritage over thousands of years, and view work from contemporary artists and makers.

Menai Bridge

Menai Suspension Bridge over a body of water in Menai Bridge, Anglesey, Wales, UK

Menai Suspension Bridge over a body of water in Menai Bridge, Anglesey, Wales, UK

Menai Bridge is not actually just a bridge - it's a town overlooking the wonderful Menai Strait. The famous Menai Suspension Bridge and the Britannia Bridge link Anglesey with the mainland, and are a must-see when visiting the town, especially for any budding photographers out there. There’s even a museum should you want to learn more about the history of the bridges and the town, and why wouldn't you? If you're interested in a bit of shopping, Menai Bridge has an interesting collection of shops including antiques, books and ironmongers, and the local seafood makes for a delicious lunch break. If you’re travelling with little ones, a trip to Pili Palas Nature World should keep them happy as they make friends with all kinds of creatures. For the big kids, Plas Cadnant Hidden Gardens is a historic country estate with vibrant landscaped gardens and a tearoom. Definitely one for everyone, this pleasant little town.

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