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Where to Enjoy Walking in Anglesey

Heading off on a walking holiday around the island of Anglesey? Here are just a few of the most scenic routes

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A view of St Cwyfan’s Church on a hill in the distance behind water and rocks at sunset in Anglesey, Wales, UK

With over 125 miles of coastline, there’s simply no excuse not to go walking in Anglesey. From dramatic cliffs and sheltered coves, to rolling countryside and peaceful woodland, Anglesey is full of beautiful landscapes to discover. There’s something for everyone here, whether you’re looking for a long-distance walk or a gentle stroll, so pack your hiking boots and get out the house. With so many walking routes available, the choice isn't easy, but that's exactly where we come in. Here at Plum Guide, we have all the inside knowledge on Anglesey, and know exactly where to walk for the most memorable days out. Before you set off on your ramble, take a look at our expert guide to the best walks on the island, and you'll be in no danger of missing out.

Anglesey Coastal Path

Close up of an old white lighthouse on a hill overlooking the sea along the Anglesey Coastal Path, Wales, UK

Close up of an old white lighthouse on a hill overlooking the sea along the Anglesey Coastal Path, Wales, UK

The most well-known walk, of course, is the Isle of Anglesey Coastal Path. This is a must-visit for every serious walker - who has enough time on their hands. The route winds around the island for approximately 130 miles, and takes an average of 12 days to complete (we weren’t kidding when we said long-distance). The path is located within an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) which covers around 95% of the coast, so you’re guaranteed scenic views wherever you go, making for the perfect motivation. The official starting point for the walk is St Cybi’s Church in Holyhead, and takes you past picturesque beaches, coastal heath, farmland, sand dunes, and woodland. Upon completing the full 130 miles, you’ll be rewarded with a special badge and certificate recognising your achievement. If you don’t have 12 days (or the willpower) to spare, there are many shorter sections of the path that you can take instead.

The Marquess, Plum Guide home in Wales

The Marquess, Plum Guide home in Wales

Cemaes Bay

A great way to get a dose of those dramatic coastal views, without doing the entire Anglesey Coastal Path, is by taking on the five mile circular walk from Cemaes Bay. Starting in the village of Cemaes on the island’s north coast, you’ll head inland past old chapels, quaint stone buildings, and winding country paths. Keep your eyes peeled for the brickworks in Porth Wen bay - dating back to the 1800s, this abandoned factory once produced firebricks made from silica. Although access is restricted, it’s still a very impressive sight to see. Further on, the walk takes you through several kissing gates (the perfect place to bring a date) before reaching the majestic cliff top paths. Here you’ll find the remains of the Llanlleiana Porcelain Works, another heritage site which closed in 1920 after being damaged by a huge fire. After having a nosy around the ruins, continue your walk along the Anglesey Coastal Path back to Cemaes Bay.

Stone Lemons, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Stone Lemons, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Parys Mountain to Amlwch Port

Parys Mountain is another must-visit for anyone planning on walking in Anglesey (you'd better have a considerable amount of time here to get through all these). Once the largest copper mine in Europe in the late 1700s, the mountain is a Mars-like landscape of red, orange, yellow, and brown. If the word ‘mountain’ is sending you into a frenzy, don’t worry - despite its name, the site is a mere 150 metres tall, so it’s nothing too strenuous. Full of striking rocks and minerals, take in the ‘Copper Kingdom’ from the viewing platform. Once you've explored to your heart’s content, take the path downhill past picturesque Welsh countryside to the town of Amlwch. To the north of the town you’ll find the pretty Amlwch Port - an ideal place to rest and recuperate while watching the boats go by.Sounds pleasant, doesn't it?

The Lark Song, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

The Lark Song, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales, UK

Britannia Bridge to Menai Bridge

A boat sailing on the water under Menai Bridge, Anglesey, Wales, UK

A boat sailing on the water under Menai Bridge, Anglesey, Wales, UK

The famous Britannia Bridge and the Menai Bridge link Anglesey with the mainland, so you'll never feel too isolated out here. Both were built to carry rail traffic in the 19th century, and are considered two of the great industrial wonders of this period. Although you can walk between the two bridges in under half an hour, we recommend venturing a little further afield to Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch (no, a cat didn’t just run over our keyboard). This village has the longest place name in Europe, making it an attraction in itself, with visitors lining up to take a photo with the renowned train station sign. Follow the path leading out of the village which guides you through pretty countryside down to Britannia Bridge. You decide whether you want to cross the bridge or not - either way, you’ll be met with delightful little footpaths and Welsh landmarks. Slightly further on is the Menai Bridge, standing 30 metres above the water. This is a great spot to have a picnic and take in the remarkable structure, or simply to admire the natural surroundings.

Hunting The Wren, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Hunting The Wren, Plum Guide home in Anglesey, Wales

Llangefni Dingle Nature Reserve

The Dingle is a 25-acre wooded valley in Llangefni, a market town in the centre of the island. This steep-sided gorge was formed by glacial meltwater during the last ice age, leading to one of its Welsh names, Nant y Dilyw (Valley of the Deluge). The valley is rich in wildlife, and home to many species including kingfishers, woodpeckers, foxes, bats, and dragonflies. The nature reserve offers gentle and scenic walks, taking you through magical woodland carpeted with vibrant bluebells and dainty wood anemone. Bisected by the River Cefni, the Dingle has a wooden boardwalk that winds its way along the river, making it suitable for those in wheelchairs and pushchairs, so bring the whole family along for the fun.

Beaumaris to Penmon Point

A low angle view of Beaumaris Castle from the front of the building, Anglesey, Wales, UK

A low angle view of Beaumaris Castle from the front of the building, Anglesey, Wales, UK

One of the best things about walking in Anglesey is that you can get up close and personal with some of the island’s most famous sites. Beaumaris Castle is one of them, known as the greatest castle that never was. This was the last of the royal strongholds built by Edward I in Wales, but money troubles and unrest in Scotland meant that building came to a halt. After walking around the unfinished fortress, head north along the Anglesey Coastal Path and admire the breathtaking sights of the Carneddau Mountains. Follow the path through the peaceful coastal countryside to the village of Penmon, home to the Trwyn Du Lighthouse which marks the entrance to the Menai Strait.

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